AQUATIC INVASIVE SPECIES

WHAT MAKES A SPECIES INVASIVE?

A competitive edge.

Invasive species are generalists. They can eat a wide range of foods and survive in many conditions.

Catch me... if you can?

With few natural predators invasive species can continue to breed, eat, and out-compete native species.

Baby BOOM!

Whether hundreds of seeds or millions of eggs, invasives have a reproductive advantage that allows more offspring to survive and continue the cycle. 

HOW CAN I HELP?

Be the change

Boat, paddle or fish?
Learn how to keep your gear clean.

Be a water monitor

Join a statewide network of volunteers.
Monitor your local waters as a community scientist.

SPECIES OF CONCERN

Plants

Animals

AIS Strategic Plan | A Roadmap

Aquatic Invasive Species Strategic Plan for the Mississippi River and Major Tributaries
in La Crosse, Trempealeau and Buffalo Counties
Download (PDF)

Recent Blog Posts

Snapshot Day volunteers found new invasive species’ sightings

Every year, Snapshot Day, a statewide scavenger hunt for AIS, supplies a vast amount of data to the DNR that ultimately helps guide management efforts.

Keep an eye out for invasive knotweed

Invasive knotweed plants are in bloom in August. It’s a good time to report knotweed to the DNR. Learn how.

Janice Redford on being a water monitor

Janice Redford has volunteered as a water monitor for her local creek for over two decades. River Alliance talked to Janice about what motivates her to fulfill such a deep commitment to water protection. For her, it all starts with observing Koshkonong Creek as it flows through CamRock County Park, noting its changes, and using that information to advocate for cleaner water and more community stewardship of the land.

Learn More

Want to learn more about Aquatic Invasive Species programs and opportunities?
Contact us at [email protected]